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Rebecca Crouch

PT, DPT, MS, CCS, FAACVPR

Dr. Rebecca Crouch has practiced cardiovascular and pulmonary physical therapy in the acute care and outpatient rehabilitation settings, and was a founding member and director of the Duke University pulmonary rehabilitation outpatient program for 30 years. She is now an assistant professor in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Campbell University, and her clinical practice is in acute care at Duke.

She has written numerous publications and given presentations in the areas of pulmonary rehabilitation, oxygen management for physical therapists, evaluation and exercise for the cardiopulmonary transplant and medical pulmonary populations, and outcomes measurement. Dr. Crouch has been involved in several professional organizations, including the American Physical Therapy Association (Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Section), American Thoracic Society (state and national), and the American Association of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention.

Dr. Crouch is a business partner in PT Cardiopulmonary Educators, a webinar-based educational service, and is CEO of Cardiopulmonary Therapy Resources, a cardiopulmonary consulting business.

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Physical Therapist Exercise Treatment of Chronic Lung Disease

Presented by Rebecca Crouch, PT, DPT, MS, CCS, FAACVPR

Physical Therapist Exercise Treatment of Chronic Lung Disease

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.

There is a significant need for pulmonary rehabilitation therapy across the country. Chronic lower respiratory disease is the third leading cause of death in the United States. There are approximately 30 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with COPD. The state-wide prevalence of Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) ranges from a low of 3.9% to a high of 9.3%. The Southeastern U.S. has been particularly vulnerable to the disease due to the higher use of tobacco products and agricultural/industrial exposures. Pulmonary rehabilitation therapy is an important component of total care for any patient with chronic respiratory disease and is thought to provide the greatest improvement in symptoms, exercise capacity, and health-related quality of life of any therapy available for patients with COPD. Physical therapists have unique skills to deliver exercise therapy to the pulmonary population. In addition to deconditioning, these patients are also known to have muscle weakness, postural abnormalities, and balance impairments that respond very well to physical therapy intervention.

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Preventing Readmission With COPD: Transition From Acute to Home Care

Presented by Rebecca Crouch, PT, DPT, MS, CCS, FAACVPR, Ellen Hillegass, PT, EdD, CCS, FAPTA, and Kenneth L. Miller, PT, DPT, GCS, CEEAA

Preventing Readmission With COPD: Transition From Acute to Home Care

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.

Readmission to the hospital for patients with COPD is a national concern. It is a problem for hospitals because it comes with a penalty from CMS if the readmission occurs within 30 days of discharge. Patients with COPD require monitoring beyond the acute care setting, and the current evidence supports continued monitoring of these patients beyond the acute care setting and the acute exacerbation. However, transition from the acute care setting to the home (or outpatient setting) is not always smooth, and communication is often lacking. This course will discuss the problem of readmission and transition of care, as well as the patient with COPD who is treated in the acute care setting and moves to the home setting. The identification of COPD patients at high risk for readmission will be discussed, along with the medications the patients may be sent home with and best practice for care in the home and outside the hospital.

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Preventing Readmission With Heart Failure

Presented by Rebecca Crouch, PT, DPT, MS, CCS, FAACVPR, Ellen Hillegass, PT, EdD, CCS, FAPTA, and Kenneth L. Miller, PT, DPT, GCS, CEEAA

Preventing Readmission With Heart Failure

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.

Readmission to the hospital for patients with heart failure is a national concern. It is a problem for hospitals because it comes with a penalty from CMS if the readmission occurs within 30 days of discharge. Patients with heart failure require monitoring beyond the acute care setting, and current evidence supports continued monitoring of these patients beyond the acute care setting. However, transition from the acute care setting to the home (or outpatient setting) is not always smooth, and communication is often lacking.
This course will discuss the problem of readmission and transition of care, as well as how heart failure is treated in the acute care setting and moves to the home setting. The identification of heart failure patients at high risk for readmission will be discussed, along with the medications the patients may be sent home with and best practice for care in the home and outside the hospital.

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